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How & Why Age is Related to Anxiety

Anxiety affects millions of people, from very young children to seniors, and impacts their daily lives. Some types of anxiety disorders are more commonly seen at specific stages of life, and other types of anxieties are prevalent among all ages. Anxiety is something that is becoming more understood by the medical community and treatable by different therapies, including non prescription anxiety medication. Today, there is less of a stigma with an anxiety disorder, which may help people suffering from troubles with anxiety more likely to seek treatment. Here are some ways how anxiety is connected to age.

Phobias

The most common anxiety disorder seen in children is a phobia. While it’s normal for young children to be afraid of some scary things, such as the dark, monsters, bugs or other things that are unfamiliar to them, it becomes a problem when it gets in the way of the daily routine. Phobias are extreme fears of things such as animals, needles, thunderstorms, heights and other things that are part of everyday life. Young children go through development changes that require a little more independence, and sometimes that can be scary. Treatments like a natural anxiety medication for children or working with a therapist are some options parents have to help kids with phobias.

General Anxiety Disorder

As children get older and go through elementary school and middle school, the instances of phobias may decrease as cases of general anxiety disorder increase. Children with general anxiety disorder may struggle with various worries, such as getting good grades, doing well in sports, friendships with their peers and living up to their family’s standards. Children with general anxiety disorder may struggle with the idea of perfection and be afraid to fail. This stage of development has some kids striving to be the best and having trouble with making mistakes.

Social Anxiety Disorder

Children in high school and young adults sometimes struggle with social anxiety disorder. This type of anxiety is seen in younger children sometimes but seems to be more common in teenagers and young adults. Social anxiety is often related to peer relationships, which are significant in the high school and young adult experience. Young people with social anxiety struggle with making and keeping friends and going to social situations, such as parties and gatherings.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Once people reach adulthood, some of the anxiety disorders change in frequency. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is sometimes seen more often in adults than in children. As the brain develops and changes into the adult mind, sometimes different obsessions or rituals may take over. People with this type of anxiety may try different ways to control their symptoms, such as natural ADHD meds for adults or cognitive behavioral therapy.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder typically occurs after someone experiences trauma. While some children who have experienced abuse may suffer from PTSD at some point in their lives, it’s often seen more in adults due to having more experiences in life. Sexual assault, violence, serious illness and other terrifying moments may trigger PTSD.

Anxiety disorders are seen in every age, but some types are more common at certain developmental stages. Some of these disorders appear in childhood and then make a recurrence later in life, while other types of anxiety may only occur once in a person’s life.